Abusive dating statistics

Kids are most likely to talk about it with their friends rather than their parents, so if you are a parent make sure to read these articles about Children and Teen violence.

43% of college women report experiencing abusive dating behaviors including physical, sexual, tech, verbal or controlling abuse; the most common abusive behavior experience is controlling behavior (32%), physical (22%) and sexual (22%). Conducted by Knowledge Networks, (December 2010), “College Dating Violence and Abuse Poll”. Conducted by Tru Insight, (June 2009), “Teen Dating Abuse Report”.

If you think you're in an abusive relationship, it's time to get out of it.

Confide in someone, such as a parent, trusted adult, health provider, or friend.

You may find yourself cutting ties with friends to avoid arguments. The less people you see, the more influence the abuser can exercise over you. How do you know that you have a healthy relationship?

Jennifer Gómez never forgot about her high school boyfriend after graduation.

Teens report an even higher occurrence of abusive dating behaviors including physical, sexual, tech, verbal or controlling abuse; the most common abusive behavior experience is controlling behavior (47%), physical/sexual (29%) and tech (24%). Threats of suicide or self-harm is the leading reason why a college student who is an abused partner stays in the relationship (24%).

But these behaviors can lead to more serious violence like physical assault and rape.Among those college students that experience an abusive relationship, 70% did not realize at the time they were in an abusive relationship, 60% said no one stepped in to try to help them and 42% kept the abuse private and didn’t tell others about it. Conducted by Knowledge Networks, (December 2010), “College Dating Violence and Abuse Poll”. Conducted by Tru Insight, (June 2009), “Teen Dating Abuse Report”.Dating abuse ranks dead last on a list of topics parents most commonly discuss with their teens: school/grades (95%), money (90%), the economy (83%), family finances (78%), dating relationships (72%), alcohol (71%), drugs (71%), sex (64%) and dating abuse (31%). 52% of college students know someone in an abusive relationship yet only 8% see it as a major campus problem and many don’t intervene for the following reasons: think it will make the matter worse (62%), feel it is not their business (60%), think it will hurt their relationship with the victim (60%), they know the abuser (56%), and afraid the abuser might make their life more difficult (56%). Conducted by Knowledge Networks, (December 2010), “College Dating Violence and Abuse Poll”. Conducted by Tru Insight, (June 2009), “Teen Dating Abuse Report”. The first step in getting out of an abusive relationship is to realize that you have the right to be treated with respect and not be physically or emotionally harmed by another person. ." is a warning of possible abuse, and a sign that your partner is trying to manipulate you.Important warning signs that you may be involved in an abusive relationship include when someone: Unwanted sexual advances that make you uncomfortable are also red flags. A statement like this is controlling and is used by people who are only concerned about getting what they want — not caring about what you want. If something doesn't feel right, it probably isn't.